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violence. all of your efforts. this started. eleven have always. some kind of environment. this case. many of them -- >> okay. first question, yes. a lot did actually have a lot of spin-off benefits. that is a lemon scent. because these laws were passed and there was such a nationwide applaud that the government began -- the parliament became open to the other laws. there we took the other laws that got past because of this one. and also, the issue is so tabooed, even the sexual assault and rape, and these issues are also so tabooed that now people are starting to even the president and prime master and the speeches of the anti sexual-harassment law. okay. now the world is getting very popular. so now it is almost creating a space where even in cestus coming out of the space. so rather than saying incest was it would not to run television a lot of sexual violence and sexual assault and rape is also coming, which is heated. fine. other terms. for example, rape, we do not have that yet. but we are coming close. when is that the case of the new york. we had it outside the un system. this big
different kids thrive in different environments. i did come away with the conclusion it's vital that parents, staff, and students come together against a shared vision of culture, organically or through the hard process of mutual dialogue and understanding. i think the book shows the success that happens when that occurs when that happens and the struggles that a school un if doesn't. as one example, one of the schools i followed which struggled quite a bit in the first year did have this one sort of amazing success on that point, the principle early on in the year introduced the school, the students to the wolf fable, and the fable goes that there are these two wolves inside all of us constantly fighting and one wolf represents greed and anger, and the other wolf represents love and humility, and the moral is the wolf that wins at the end is the one you feed. that really took on a life of its own at the school and among the kids and students and students told each other to remember to feed the good wolf or to make sure the good wolf wins in the end. i think at successful schools, you have a
environment in africa is different than other parts of the world. i'm shiewfer that was a factor. some of the aircraft you're referring to are actually -- we don't want them in the inventory. of their sustain ability and capability. so, i mean, i know the analysis was done. i'm sure that it followed the rules of competition by the federal acquisition regulation. i don't know the ci think the am looking for here is before we do contracting as a default position on logistic, as we're, i mean, what i worry about in the sriing budget environment there's going to be more o tenden just sthat we should contract it out. because it's cheaper. and if afghanistan and iraq applaud anything that's not always true. and if you don't have adequate contracting oversight. it's not and especially when it's inherently a governmental function and we can spend a whole hearing tsh we -- we have many on that. i want to make sure it's a new day. as we begin to do new solicitation for new logistic support contract in any threat environment, there has to be a really detailed analysis done as to it is going to sa
despair and poverty as well as the uncertain implications of the environment of degradation. meanwhile the face of technological change and the spread of advanced military technology to state and nonstate actors poses an increasing challenge to the united states military. this is the strategic environment facing the department of defense as it enters a third year of flat declining budgets. the onset of these these resource constraints hazarded lead to significant and ongoing belt-tightening and military modernization force structure personnel and overhead expenditures. you have noted some of those mr. chairman. it has also given us an opportunity, an opportunity to to reshape the military and reform defense institutions to better reflect 21st century realities flexibility agility. the process began in the leadership of secretary gates who canceled or curtailed more than 30 modernization programs and trimmed overhead costs within the military services and across the defense enterprise. the realignment continued undersecretary panetta who worked closely with the president and the joint c
streaming and research on news activism and environment. and based in washington d.c. at the national endowment for democracy. and over red light areas, released by oxford and forgotten cases. and in japanese have become popular among young pakistani women. and the doctorate working at the university of minnesota. please join in welcoming today's guest dr. fouzia saeed. [applause] >> very nice to be here and i look forward to the next hour of engagement with you. if you want to turn this off you can, at least up to the limit. i am going to tell you a story today and the stories in the context of pakistan, about one woman and also celebration of women in pakistan but it resonates universally, goes across borders. this is about a legislation we got in pakistan against sexual harassment. we got these laws passed in 2010 and i will tell you why these laws are so important for us. one reason was after years of militancy women were being pushed back in the last decade and a half conlan this was the first come back, the first assertion from the side of women to regain public space or space i
started working war college, every faculty member was high up as a full professor. in an environment where they are so right conscious, the idea of hiring people, all faculty members as a full professor is just unheard of and hurt the institutional credibility. trying to explain that to a kernel of why they should not be a full professor fell on ears. this is a problem how to administrators who really have no experience is part of the problem. the other part of the problem and i'll be honest i'll be writing a following chapter of the department chair from the naval war college, captain tony were body are doing a book chapter that was the oversight? with the supervision? there to supervising organizations with something called military education coordinating council -- the military loves acronyms. a part of the pentagon called the g7, part of the joint staff. the congress is busy. we on the sequestration is basically taking up all of their time. the economy. now that allows those in the pentagon and those that this military coordinating council, to basically it our what i've been told they
is above sea level rise and certainly when we talk about the environment. as the title of this panel says, along green view. it is absolutely about how the complexities of human decision making, human settlement, individual ambition, always contradictory emotions of people have shape not only what the environment is, we impact it and give them access. but how we think of it to my we formulate the idea of the wild and now often that is based on these often very self-serving tropes that we invented. so the environment is about history, human action. and in this but what i tried to do is to show how some of those crosscurrents work. he said sell thing boils down to the final decisive battle but against the indians to have been an extremely aggressive northern plains tribe who had been the ones first to master horses and had arranged absolutely right through the yellowstone country hunting in the fire all, for example. once there were dealt with the exploration could continue, but one last cautionary note goes back to the question of prison. i think it is very easy when people look at this bo
every time i walked into the room because that would change the environment. i change the environment because i was always present but i didn't always want him to interact because i really wanted to document real moments and not change anything. so, that was my role. >> host: you write that it was magical whenever president bush and his father were together. there are a lot of photos of the two presidents bush in this book. >> guest: first of all they look so alike which is really interesting and anytime they were together it was like history in the making because you have two presidents together, father and son. the second son of the president to become president and it was always really interesting photographing them together as a family. they are so normal in lots of ways other than the fact that they are two presidents together. i really enjoyed documenting the family and the entire bush family. >> host: and did you get to know mrs. bush as well? >> guest: i did. >> host: i want to ask about this photo on a very very long couch. how did this come about? >> guest: this was inside t
-- [inaudible] the serious threat assessment our threat environment is changing. threats are more interconnected and viral. defense which it first -- disruption with the u.s national interest. i would ketrn to a few of the issues e identify in the statement for the record. our statement to the lead was cyber. as mor more state and demonstrate actors gained expertise. it's important to reach a global threat cannot be overstated. this year our discussion natural resources also more prominent because climb in disease and competition for natural resources and huge national security implications. many import are extreme war and food stress that can destablize governments that can trigger conflict. on the issue of terrorism, the threat from al qaeda and the potential for a massive coordinated attack on the united may be diminished. but it's more diffuse. as the president stated on tuesday about the boston marathon bombing we don't know it was planned by an group effort or individual act. lone inspire our affiliated group are determined to attack. the turmoil in the arab world brought a spike in threat
with the up-tempo nature of the opposed. we had two divisions they are. can be a highly stressful environment and as a young captain eric two years back and so for me it's somewhat personal. i was also a judge advocate there. i prosecuted cases and another prosecutor. he's a former defense defense attorney very well. i want to try to get to if we can clarity on the issue, which sthink of is e theydes my first question is, and if you could keep these answers as much as possible to yes or now so i can get through his many s possible, did dod officials consort you are members of your department regarding the decision to designate attacks on military and civilian personnel at the mac to work with violence? >> this is answer that is not yes or no. i'm just not familiar when interaction with advocate a part of defense with regard to this issue. >> of the witness would yield. this is a gentleman prosecuted by dod, by the department of defense, not the department of justice. john mchugh is a former republican is in his second term in the obama administration. this is a military procedure in terms of
access to them in our modern media environment it's so fractured that people are targeting small niches. how do i get young males or middle aged women or black people, and unfortunately i think some media outlets decided to use pledge dirks stereo type, even close to racism to draw in an audience and keep the audience on their platform rather than going to others. so what i try to do in this book, i try to explore that a little bit. try toy describe why that is happening and help people diffuse these things so they can recognize it when they seive it on fox news channel, on msnby, on the drudge report, they have a sense of what is going on, and they're made more media literate and they can response in a way that makes sense. >> host: eric deegans is our guest. the book "race-baiter." the numbers are on the screen. >> host: you can also contact m-deegans by social media. our >> mr. deegans, you used the term coded language. what does that mean? >> guest: well, there's lot of ways -- because i say one of the great successes of the civil rights movement is that we have reached the point wh
am determined to facilitate the economic environment and raise the tax rate. based on provision, comprehensive tax reform act. and japan's own entitlement reform to put the government expenditure in check. previously the g 20 meetings. together with other member nations, we aim the primary balance to fiscal the -- fiscal year 2015 and from 2010 and we also keeping family balance, by 2020. we are going to publish medium-term fiscal plans around the middle of this year. the second interest-rate hike is avoidable. economics should take a deep root for an economy to see sustainable growth. finally let me say only a few words about what kind of country japan not to be. japan should be a place where effort, japan must be a place where thinkers, risktakers can be given opportunities not just once but many times. prime minister presents a chance for a second coming in japan. japan must be a place where the sense continues. japan must be a place for innovation. japan is on the cutting edge of new medical technology. the nobel prize winner said japan is a country that is a bonus to bringi
store and there are issues i have about consumer protection in that environment. while i appreciate, it is a concept that could work, we need strategies that are going to take into consideration varying factors and that the goal here, and in addition to being able to be in the black, is that, you have a public service and we have to serve these con at this time cents. i would really encourage you with your leadership on the board of governors to really think about ways that are going to be unique, more than just flexibility to get there. that you're looking at quality, connectivity, those relationships, the rural fabric in these states, related to the post office. when i was in inaing the postal service was a very effective partner in receiving those constituents, thank you. i yield back. >> thank you. and recognize the gentleman from mr. georgia. >> thank you, mr. chairman. just in listening and writing down notes, we went all over the map from the importance of postal service. i don't think anybody will detract from that. we talked before. you been in committees before. i serve an
environment within the isaf another industry groupings. certainly companies don't want to share competitive information with the antitrust issues. there are some restrictions bidirectionally between the government which has some classified information and financial institutions that there has to be a trust relationship included there are. there are some areas where the government cannot, simply cannot share information with the banks and the financial sector may not share information with the government with privacy concerns, civil liberties sharing financial information etc.. >> host: mr. dumont has there have been an attack on the air traffic control system that has stopped traffic? >> guest: no, actually not. but it's something we have to worry about. there are different levels of attacks in and there would be different reasons for attacks. there's there is a reason to bring down an aircraft which would be a terrorist type thing which as we were discussing in the other room, it's horrific and it's a big catastrophe and it gets a lot of attention. more importantly if we cripple the air tr
as well as the overall fiscal environment, i believe that controlling energy costs across the board now and in the future is an important goal for the department of defense. the operational energy implementation plan that was -- that identified incorporating energy security concerns into the requirements and acquisitions process as one of the targets for the department to implement, you know, i wtedte importance of those goals and how we are doing and making sure that energy use criteria and factors are consideredded in acquisition planning processes. >> thank you, senator. as i noted in my response for me or the leadership in the department of defense, our energy use, our energy sources, cost and energy, are and must be a high priority. that's research and development. it's not just budget, but it's the security, reliant of our sources of energy, so we continue to put a high priority on programs. we continue to invest in those programs. as you noted, as has been much of the conversation this morning, we have less money. >> uh-huh. >> appears we're going to have even less money, so we h
to the sponsoring residents because you have a good learning environment is that is a you become good doctors. it is interesting obama used to talk about overuse with a speech he gave to congress and the first term he mentioned we have to curtail overuse. but i don't hear president obama talking about over use any more as a factor in reducing medicare spending. so once again is the informed members to put back on the agenda and citizens will have to correct the misallocation of resources. while preparing for the talk i was thinking what are some of these solutions? was sentenced in new jersey walking along nassau street and there was a bookstore in there was a'' how democracy democracy, to fix it will need more democracy we need more informed citizens of what is aware of what is going on to have the checks and balance of the system. the biggest challenge we face is health care company's primary duty to shareholders they have to demonstrate increased revenue and profitability and has a condition of their statute in this drives it up. this is in direct conflict as state and federal governments.
. the whole idea of the urban environment derailed, but the plans put forward for the park and for the national park. the same state and federal officials of the philadelphians are dealing with for the u.n. proposal were the ones who also were going to sign off on the part. this interesting connections there certainly. >> charlene, just being aware of time is here, but to continue the dialogue. i'd like to thank her again for her presentation. [applause] >> where the conservative book local action conference in washington d.c. with author paul kengor of "the communist." who was frank marshall davis? >> frank marshall davis was born in kansas 1905, died and made you and 87. ended up in chicago and ultimately honolulu and that's where he would meet a young man named barack obama in the 70s. he was introduced by obama's grandfather, stanley dunham. i should back up a little bit. he was african-american. he was a republican from the time of lincoln to fdr. remarkably what so far to the left that during world war ii he joined the communist party. he joined communist party u.s.a.
environment for the exercise of civil liberties. this includes the measures with respect to registration of ngos as foreign agents but also restrictions on press and internet freedom act. so we've made clear our commitment to dialogue on human rights with the russian government, but we also remain actually committed to open dialogue with civil society and supporting their efforts. >> can i do a follow-up on that? i just wanted, i mean, the u.s. government has talked a lot about, concern about human rights abuses in chechnya. and i just wonder if you think the events in boston are going to change in any way the way the government will see human rights in chechnya? >> with respect to the ongoing investigationnbston, i just etars, that would be highly inappropriate to make further comment at this time. with respect to the situation in the northern caucasus, i can tell you this has been part of our human rights reporting. on russia and our country reports since 1995 you'll find quite a bit of information in this year's report. and they know serious human rights abuses taking place, and acts
in a challenging economic environment. the question for all of us is how long willho that last that e consumers held up relatively well. i think we alsoly see that in spending and the credit risk -- or formants which have substantially come down verall, they're at close to historical lows. we're performing a50% better than the major bank card issuers. so i think that that demonstrates some view that the consumer health is pretty decent. consumer confidence held up pretty well. but, frankly, david, i've really been of the view not surprisingly that the economic recovery as i look at in the broad scale is going to be relatively slow. i don't have a great deal of confidence that there's going to be any turnaround in the near term. and i think what we've got to hope for is that it >> over the last, certainly over the last four years of this administration part of a long-term trend as i've outlined in the book is using more and more state power to impose a particular worldview called liberalism and i will go into a definition of that so we are not using terms loosely but as a christian i am worried
. as of today this report will hopefully put into focus some of the actions taken in the post 9/11 environment. there are some key questions we wanted to address this morning. one, did the treatment of suspected terrorists and u.s. custody rise to the left of torture? second how did this happen and what can we learn from this to make better decisions to the future. we found the u.s. personnel in many instances used interrogation techniques on detainee's that constitute torture. american personnel conducted an even larger number of interrogations' with kroll and humane degrading treatment. both categories of actions violate u.s. law and international treaty obligations this conclusion is and based upon our own personal impressions, but rather grounded in a thorough and detailed examination of what constitutes the torture from a historical and legal context. we looked at court cases and determined that the treatment of detainees and many instances met the standards. the courts have determined constituting torture. but you look at the united states state department and its annual country reports
for a few hours and to institute special targeting rules both in the air environment and at the canadian border environment in case there were those seeking to escape the scene. with respect to fema, i can, when saw the response in boston and a coordinated it was, even given the level of destruction, i would remind the committee that just last november, boston held a massive exercise on how to deal with a mass casualty event. and that exercise was the kind of exercise and exercise is supported by the committee through fema to local areas, and again increasing our ability for response and resilience. we have worked with the fbi and ietotate lct ross e critical infrarurs d oprators, and we've been reaching out to faith-based organizations, community organizations and others who want to know what they can do. we are implementing a number of security measures, both seen and unseen at airports, transit hubs within the maritime environment, and at ports of entry. the coast guard is provided security on the ferries in the boston area. viper teams are doing searches on terms of ground transporta
's another power we can use the environment. that is the power of persuasion. here we are lucky as both of us ex-prime ministers, he and i have met a whole bunch0s ceos and they should remember their patriotism and hire more, or pay more to their employees. it is -- for the first time in many years an increasing number of companies are willing to pay more. however, getting rid of denation -- deflation mindset alone cannot hamper long-lasting recovery. we most leave people with expectation to sustainable economic growth. and for the purpose we must have two downside risk. one, inflation without growth. two, interest rate hike without growth. let me understand one by one. let's assume that you now have rising cpi, but you have no pay rise. the economy is that is a bad inflation. people should suffer then. it is right here that the third bazooka should come into play. the third bazooka, if you recall, is a package of growth enhancement policies. i know it's hard to come by. i am not saying we can do very easily. still, it takes us only to look into miller -- into mirror to see who you are and th
and take steps to address the environment degradation. the issues are polarizing. [laughter] but president grimson serve as iceland's finance minister. in 2008 he presided over iceland's near economic collapse. the country's unique response which included social and political reform and allowing the banks to pull pulled iceland back from the brink without the austerity measures. perhaps most challenging of all he raised twin girls. please hiv me give a warm national press club welcome back to president grimsson. [applause] [applause] >> thank you. thank you very much. for these words of welcome and thank you for hosting us at the national press club here today for a special occasion where i have privilege to announce the establishment of a new venue aimed at enhangs the dialogue on corporate issues. i know, sometimes here in washington, the arctic looks as if it is far away. perhapses in the minds of many, still the hidden part of the world as it was. in the beginning of the 20th century. where the knowledge of that the neighbor to our countries was still very limited. and in fact remains
environment. it is set fire to our living room. if that doesn't stop -- you know, again, because it has not stopped, that is something else that has led us to where we are now, and that's something else plays and a big way in my stories. alexei, by stories in the desert rock and explore this question . it is a place. the fuel the american dreams. freer killing off the space, or is the lead is? >> thank you. >> well, my main reason that i hope people will read this chandra of books and my book in particular , i really tried .. and loads of cash with cocaine on them. the mothers are doing drugs and the moms are physically present but they're not emotionally present. you will end up with the kid who may or may not go out and hurt other people. even though when the karen's really do care and make wrong decisions or they don't keep their eyes open because they are victims themselves. they can try as hard as they can. it's tough but it seems that the parent does play an important role in these cases. >> thank you all very much and thank you all for joining us. [applause]
environment, we are warriors as opposed to common criminals who should be should be investigated and based on that investigation prosecuted to the fullest extent of the law? many people have made grandiose claims about wanting to be in a war. how that ends up getting decided is based on facts on the ground. it is based on law and facts not on suppositions or on the grandiose claims of people who would like to be bigger than they are. >> host: him ma shamsi with the aclu, american civil libertis. and cliff may, foundation for defense of democracies. he writes a weekly column distributed by scripps howard news service and contributes to nationalreview.online, townhall.com among other publications a lot of folks want to talk to you. let's get back to the lines. charles, wood bridge, virginia, republican, go ahead. >> caller: thanks. you know i am a republican and i am an american obviously and i, my stance is that, i believe -- [inaudible] >> host: charles, we're losing you right as we get. >> caller: i'm sorry. >> host: say it again? >> caller: thank you, i'm sorry. i believe that the admini
the business rules fixed for this environment, and we think that this will be sufficient in 14. >> other questions for the record. that last question was something that i know you and i have talked about, how to maximize delivery to the veterans in tough locations, rural locations we will see one coming in a thank you for that effort. >> thank you, mr. chairman. i apologize for being late. i have been following some of the testimony. want to thank your for your service. mr. secretary, particularly for your active duty service to our nation. now in the department of veterans affairs, and to the president for increasing the resources available to our veterans in a very difficult time fiscally. let me begin with the senators area of inquiry relating to the electronic of record. i had understood that you described what was going to happen, but i am not sure that i heard what the target date was. >> we're talking about clam's year, completing the claims. >> the electronic record. >> the electronic health record complete certified. >> let me talk. the electronic health record system is still g
some of the actions taken in the post-9/11 environment. there's some key questions one of -- some key questions we wanted to address this point but to the treatment of suspects -- rise to the level of torture quick secondly, if so, how did this happen? and what can we learn from this to make better decisions in the future? on the first question, we found that u.s. personnel in many instances use interrogation techniques on detainees that constitute torture. american personnel conducted an even larger number of interrogations that involve cruel, inhumane or degrading treatment. both categories of actions violate u.s. laws and international treaty obligations. this conclusion is not based upon our own personal impressions, but rather is grounded in a thorough and detailed examination of what constitutes torture from a historical and legal context. we looked at court cases and determined that the treatment of detainees in many instances met the standards, the courts have determined as constituting torture. but in addition you look at the united states state department in its annual count
's something that would have to be part of an agreement and acceptable to republicans in this environment, it is something we can defend on a technical basis. it's more accurate and because for middle class people, you know, it's a burden that is relatively small. the most vulnerable even $10 a month for the most vulnerable is a big deal. if you live to be 90 years old and all you have is the social security, that $10 can be the difference between food in the last couple of days of the month. so i think we have to distinguish between what impact going a more correct measure would have. and we have, you know, put in a way that we think is fair. by saying that the most vulnerable have the benefit go up. not because we have the overall adjustment being faster. we will make the decision to go in and make sure they're not hurt. >> thank you. >> thank you, mr. chairman. thank you for appearing. i have four sets of questions i'm going run through quickly. supplementally. first thing has to do with the crap i look at the budget. how it's crurkted. because the choice of the underpinnings of the a
environment and have been a part since iceland was -- [inaudible] >> taking step back and looking for a broadly two things i've been talking about climate change and fishing. has global environmental change been benefit to iceland's fishery or a detriment? >> well, it's very difficult to an that question, indeed it's one of the big issues -- a number of decades because it has tradition nayly been the key part of the export driven fishing circle. of course the species as well. some people are arguing cue to the -- [inaudible] so one of the reasons why there is a need for more active arctic corporation is in fact to study what is happen together fishery in the ocean of the world including the arctic and the ice melt. and i found it interesting when i invited them to iceland a few years ago, he is, as you might know, a special envoy of the president of france on arctic and polar issues. his argument was that the first dispute that would unearth nationings to a new situation in the arctic would be dispute over fisheries. that the meting of the arctic sea ice and the transmore fashion
that will come with this legislation. retailers have been operating in an environment where they have not been required to collect and remitt sales taxes for states where they do not have a physical presence. this legislation would change that almost in an instant. before we enact a new sales tax system we need to take into accounts the costs that will impose on businesses of all sizes and the difficulties those -- these companies will face as they adapt to the new regime. for example, there is the issue of vendor compensation. the streamlined sales and use tax agreement currently includes a provision giving states the opportunity to voluntarily compensate remote sellers -- quote -- "as a measure of good faith"-- unquote for registering to voluntarily collect and remit sales taxes into states where the seller has no physical presence. this is included in the agreement because under current law remote sellers are generally not required to collect and remit the sales tax and they incur a cost when doing so. the marketplace fairness act does not include any provision for compensation of remote se
political environments. another approach, one that we favor, is to lay out a better and clearer conservative vision of american society. the role of government, unlimited opportunity, of political self-government. rather than new principles, what we need are better arguments. and when you take those arguments -- we need to take those arguments to the american people. it is in that spirit that we welcome today's speaker to heritageouat mike lee is in th third year of his first term. that means more terms to follow. the first -- the third year of his first term as united states senator from the state of utah. his background is in the law and, actually, he began his background in law at his family's kitchen table. his father, rex lee, was a law school dean, assistant u.s. attorney general and solicitor general for ronald reagan. senator lee is a graduate of brigham young university and byu law school, was a law clerk for judge dean benson of the u.s. district court of the district of utah and then judge sam alito's clerk when he was at the u.s. court of appeals for the 3rd circuit. he served as
on destroying lives of innocent people. the best way in a school environment, in my view, is to confront that shooter with a traeupbt law enforcement -- trained law enforcement officer. the grassley amendment has money put back into the system that is president obama cut $300 million out of school safety at a time when i think that was very unwise. we restore that money. two months ago, maybe longer, there was a young woman at home in the atlanta suburbs with her two twin daughters. i believe they are twin daughters. there was a home invasion by someone who had just been released from jail. she took her children up into the closet on the second floor and hid in the closet, got on the cell phone call with her husband asking what to do. she grabbed the .38 revolver. the guy broke into the closet. she fired six times, hit him with the begun, hit him five of the six times and he was still able to drive away. in the hands of that mother, six shots were not enough. it wouldn't bother me one bit if she had 30 rounds. in the hands of a mentally unstable person or convicted felon, one bullet is o
and the reason is because the environment had so radically changed in a very short period of time. that's one of the things i detail. >> when we look at hawaii now we don't see that. we see the plantations and that sort of thing. so, t.d.? >> what i found out when i was researching this book is the paradise like other things is an intellectual and social construct and just as there is a paper trail in the spanish illusion that gold was to be found in florida, by the way i just want to clarify one thing it begins with the first massacre of white men in the western hemisphere certainly and north america and this is how our history began with a spanish learned there was nothing to be found. it was only tradition in florida, that was before they found out that they had established a settlement in jacksonville so they tore across the atlantic and massacred several hundred frenchmen and that is the beginning of the history. as i say in the beginning if we look at -- for this old guy looking for viagra and largely america thinks here comes a hurricane this is no understanding, but if you look at the
a weapon that is miniaturized but also can survive and function in a very stressful environment. and the important thing here is that in terms of their test history, north korea has never successfully tested a ballistic missile warhead to a range greater than 1300 kilometers. okay, then the third challenge is what missiles they have and what can they do. at the low end of the scale, the north koreans have 5-600 swan missiles which are basically a variant of the scud first flown by the soviets pack in the 1950s. and those give north korea the ability to cover targets pretty much in most of south korea. then there's the no-dong missile which has a range of 1300 kilometers, that allows coverage of targets in japan as well as south korea. but when you move beyond that, you get into a series of missiles that really cannot be regarded as proven. the focus of the last couple of weeks has been on this missile, two were reportedly moved towards the coast of north korea. there was some speculation that today in honor of the birthday there might be a launch. in this missile's supposed to h
security gates at elementary and intermediate schools to create a safer learning environment. the new exterior fences define school boundaries making the schools safer for students. entourier gates were replaced, providing the ability to lock off specific areas of the schools during emergencies. again, it's common sense but when these schools were built, madam president, no one thought about this. everything was open. like the capitol, when i came here, i'm dating myself, a long time ago, you could go anywhere. no metal detectors, no fences. walk up the steps to the capitol we have lost a lot of that freedom and our world is now to balance our freedom and the greatest country in the world with security. and that's what we're trying to do with this. in minnesota, we saw grants used to conduct security assessments and institute safety training classes. in palmer high school in colorado they implemented lockdown and evacuation procedures, doubled the number of doors operated by security cards so it reduced the number of outside individuals gaining building entry. it makes it harder for p
, but in this environment, the one thing i would ask for is more latitude in how we take the cut to fit the money with the most important payoff is. with respect to the question you raised, it is an age-old one and intelligence. the approach or try to take in the last two years is try to protect and invest in capabilities that give us the most general coverage. that's why a very strong on sustaining our overhead reconnaissance capability because it covers the earth, denied area or not and similarly, even when times are then, human capability is extremely important. that's when the hu what dr. vickers are io brilliae as much as it is a reshaping, recastg he organization i started in 1992 caughhet t defense humanrvice. better integration with the fbi and the cia. more clandestine case officer's who are worth their weight in gold. the unique capability no one else can render. as they make reductions, we have to focus much much more on quality, quality of investment since are not going to have in numbers. >> one quick question that's come up a number of times. and there is clear evidence, public evid
and present one we have to start tackling now rather than later. i am determined to facilitate the environment and basic conception tax rate, based on the provision of a comprehensive tax reform. you must also address japan's own entitlement reform to that the growth of the government expenditure in check. previously at the g20 meetings, together with other member nations we stick to it. wait a minute having the balance ratio to gdp by fiscal year 2015 than that in 2010. we also aim at achieving by 2020. we are going to publish medium-term fiscal consolidation plan around the middle of this year. the second interest rate hike is avoidable. economics should take deep root for the economically to seek sustainable growth. finally, before conclusion, let me say only a few words about what kind of country japan not to be. japan must be a place where the road needs effort. japan must be a place where risktakers can be given opportunities not just once, but many times. also, ex-prime minister present the chance for the second coming in japan. japan must be at face and a sense shotmaker cain mused, ja
be idea to pay for some things in a political environment. not to say it will because of the political coalition that is against this is quite powerful, but seems to me there's more of a possibility now than in the past. if that's of any solace. >> let me address a little bit the patient-doctor relationship or the patient-doctor-doctor relationship, which is maybe just as important, more important. one of the criticisms of traditional medicare, it is an uncoordinated system. that's correct. and the coordination isn't just between patient and doctor. obviously the fee for service incentives can get in the way of that. but it's also the failure of traditional medicare to really provide structure incentives that encourage coordination across the continuum of care, doctor to doctor, doctor to hospital. medicare is not unique in this but medicare could take more of a leading role in trying to resolve a problem that's a very difficult issue. in the end, i think what we need is health plans, whether it's medicare or other plans, that focus on this and i think that's going to be driven by the
carbon pollution in the environment than we have in nearly 20 years, but we understand this is not enough. we've got to do better, and that's why we've got to pursue an all of the above numbering strategy that includes investing in more biofuels and more fuel efficient vehicles and more solar and wind power and more people going back to work building cars and homes and businesses that are more energy efficient than the ones we've got right now. that's why i've proposed new job-creating investments in science and innovation. and all these young people, as young as they are, they're all going to be going to college, and a lot of them are going to want to continue to pursue tear research and pursue their dreams. and if there is not the research grant pipeline in place, many of them will not have the resources to invent and discover the things that will make us healthier and make us more energy efficient and improve the quality of our lives. so this is not the time to gut investments that keep our businesses on the cutting edge. that keep our economy humming, that improving, you know, the qua
we are in a law of war environment as professor somin said you can target an enemy while he's sleeping based on the status, not his activities. >> since we are talking about the method we use them are talking about low back, mr. mr. bergen and ms. al-muslimi testimony. this can argue ms. brooks or mr. berk
audiences. but in the modern media environment people target small nations and how do i get young males or the latest women or black people? and some have decided to use prejudice, stereotypes to draw the audience to keep them on that platform. so what i try to do is explore that a little bit and describe what that is happening to help people diffuse these things so they can recognize and they see it on fox news, a msnbc or the drug report they have a sense of what is going on and they're made more media at aliterate and can respond in a way that made sense for growth. you made the term coded language? >> one of the great successes of the civil-rights movement be reached a point* where our racism is marginalized and demonize, rejected. when people want to talk in these ways to invoke prejudice is that they often end news coded language. they say something that comes close to what they mean. if you see newt gingrich running for the said g.o.p. and the one double talking about how more people on food stamps during the barack obama presidency and you can dispute that figure or not. but the
to be an environment for a screw-up like we had in 1986 when we spent weeks and weeks on legislation to get it right and we didn't get it right. i yield the floor, and i suggest the absence of a quorum. the presiding officer: the clerk will call the roll. quorum call: protect more of our communities. we are going to address the bears that prevent background checks and give law enforcement more information about stolen gun so i can do his job and help put in place a plan to protect her children in their schools. but we can do more if congress gets its act together. if this congress refuses to listen to the american people and pass commonsense gun legislation, the real impact is going to have to come from the voters. all the people who supported this legislation, law enforcement and responsible gun owners, democrats and republicans, urban moms, rural hunters, whoever you are here need to let your representative of congress know that you are disappointed and if they don't act this time you will remember come election time. to the wide majority of nra households who supported this legislation you need t
of the techniques used against detainees in u.s. custody in a post-9/11 environment, the state department has characterized the same treatment as torture, abuse or cruel treatment when those techniques were applied by foreign governments. the cia recognized this in an internal review and acknowledged that many of the interrogation techniques it employed were inconsistent with the public policy positions the united states has taken regarding human rights. the united states is understandably subject to criticism when it criticizes another nation for engaging in torture and then justifies the same conduct under national security arguments. there are those that defend the techniques like waterboarding, stress positions and sleep deprivation because there was the office of legal counsel which issued a decision approving of their use because they defined them as not being torture. those opinions have since been repudiated by legal experts and the olc itself. and even in its opinion it relied not only on a very narrow legal definition of torture, but also on factual representations about how the tec
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